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About Me

I'm a pragmatic progressive whose writing is influenced by a long journey out of conservative Christian fundamentalism, as well as my professional experience as a family therapist and nonprofit executive.

Through those experiences, I honed my skills as an original thinker who looks beneath the surface, gravitates towards the hard questions, and challenges conventional wisdom.

You can follow me on Twitter, like me on Facebook and connect with me on LinkedIn.

Comments

  1. I've been meaning to write a note of appreciation. I began to notice your contributions to WM's Political Animal a few months ago. Your opinions are always fresh and intelligent. Several times, I think, I've reacted to something you've written by saying to myself, "That's the best thing I've read over the last few days."

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  2. I completely agree with the comment above. I find myself looking forward to weekends at Political Animal. Political Animal is one of the best and most intelligent blogs around and one of the few that I can still stand to read regularly.

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  3. Hi. I chanced upon your insightful essays when I was so closely following the reaction to Obama's Charleston speech and after googling to find more voices, I found yours. Since then I have read your blog consistently, and many times I have thought to write a note of appreciation. In your bio you mention that you "gravitate towards the hard questions," and I admire that and you almost always bring fresh insight. I love when you describe a current event and then enlarge the conversation with a relevant quote from King (Letter from Birmingham Jail) or Obama (Selma, just months ago).

    I look forward to following you in these most interesting times. And I have just begun following Political Animal, and when "Brother Benen" wan mentioned I knew I was right at home.

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  4. Just heard that you will take over from Ed Kikgore - congratulations!! I've been a fan and follower of yours for some time and I'm really looking forward to your work.

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  5. I navigated here from the Washington Monthly. You are one of just a couple of people whose take on the world I look forward to reading every day. Your blog will be another place I check in often.

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  6. Nancy,

    This holiday season I just want to pass along a thank you for your blogging contributions at Washington Monthly. I have appreciated the even-keel, reasoned posts that you have put together. You're one of the main reasons I donated to WaMo. Thanks so much, and I look forward to reading your work in the months and years to come.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Tom - for both the compliment and the donation :-)

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