Sunday, January 16, 2011

Good Crazy

As we are celebrating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., I saw this short video online for the first time.



It reminded me of a great column by Ta Nahisi-Coats following the 2008 election. He was reflecting on the words of Rev. Joseph Lowery about Good Crazy.

"I came over here where crazy things are happening," Lowery told his audience, and then, referring to Obama and the echoes of his own history, added: "There are people in this country who say certain things can't happen, but who can tell? Who can tell? . . . Something crazy may happen in this country."...

Here is where Barack Obama and the civil rights leaders of old are joined -- in a shocking, almost certifiable faith in humanity, something that subsequent generations lost. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. may have led African Americans out of segregation, and he may have cured incalculable numbers of white racists, but more than all that, he believed that the lion's share of the population of this country would not support the rights of thugs to pummel people who just wanted to cross a bridge. King believed in white people, and when I was a younger, more callow man, that belief made me suck my teeth. I saw it as weakness and cowardice, a lack of faith in his own. But it was the opposite. King's belief in white people was the ultimate show of strength: He was willing to give his life on a bet that they were no different from the people who lived next door.


Certainly Martin Luther King, Jr. challenged our shallow vision of the capacity of human beings in his speech, How Long? Not Long shortly after Bloody Sunday in Selma.

And so as we go away this afternoon, let us go away more than ever before committed to this struggle and committed to nonviolence. I must admit to you that there are still some difficult days ahead. We are still in for a season of suffering in many of the black belt counties of Alabama, many areas of Mississippi, many areas of Louisiana. I must admit to you that there are still jail cells waiting for us, and dark and difficult moments. But if we will go on with the faith that nonviolence and its power can transform dark yesterdays into bright tomorrows, we will be able to change all of these conditions.

And so I plead with you this afternoon as we go ahead: remain committed to nonviolence. Our aim must never be to defeat or humiliate the white man, but to win his friendship and understanding. We must come to see that the end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live with its conscience. And that will be a day not of the white man, not of the black man. That will be the day of man as man.


And now Obama is asking us to come together as Democrats, Republicans, and Independents to face the challenges of the 21st century.

Our goal should be to stick to our guns on those core values that make this country great, show a spirit of flexibility and sustained attention that can achieve those goals, and try to create the sort of serious, adult, consensus around our problems that can admit Democrats, Republicans and Independents of good will. This is more than just a matter of "framing," although clarity of language, thought, and heart are required. It's a matter of actually having faith in the American people's ability to hear a real and authentic debate about the issues that matter.


Many people on both the right and left of the political divide think that's "crazy."

But great men have always had great visions that seemed impossible to others.

There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why... I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?

- Robert Kennedy

3 comments:

  1. You have posted a very reflective message for this year's MLK Day. That short video clip was also 'new' to me - would that we all were maladjusted to peverty! Thank you for your work.

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  2. poverty (not what's written there)

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  3. Thanks VC.

    You'd probably also appreciate this from Melissa Harris-Perry along the same lines.

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